About Us

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This college was established in Waco, Texas but now proudly stands in Dallas, Texas.

 

In 1873, under the guidance of their first official pastor, Minister Frank Green. Metropolitan bought its first church building. It was on the east side of San Antonio Street, lot 1 and block 101. This section of the city had been set aside for churches and schools in Austin’s original planning.

 

Improvements were made to the structure. In November 1883, exterior walls were built and a slate roof was laid. This made Metropolitan the only building owned by Negroes to have a slate roof. All was done except the bell tower.

 

As Metropolitan grew and changed in those early years, the congregation adjusted to a succession of ministers in the names of:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On September 21, 1986, under the pastorate of Rev. Dr. David Harris, Metropolitan unveiled and dedicated its Historical Marker presented by the Texas Historical Commission. Then on April 23, 1987 the City changed the base zoning district from “SF-3 Family Residence to SF-Family Residence-Historical” on the property owned by the church.

 

In 1995 seven Projects for Progress were completed:

 

1. Acquired two lots behind the church

2. Installed an elevator in church

3. Purchased a Baby Grand Piano

4. Extended the choir loft

5. Installed thirteen stained glass windows

6. Extended the rear of the church, adding four additional rooms (choir room,                     Stewardess room, Minister's lounge (upstairs) and large storage room                               (downstairs)

7. Re-carpet the sanctuary

 

In 2004, Rev. N. Jordan Mkwanazi was assigned to Metropolitan.  

Metropolitan A.M.E. Church has had forty pastors during her 143 years of existence. Each of whom has helped Metropolitan become the outstanding church that she is today.

 

Metropolitan had its beginning in the early 1870s. A group of dedicated Black men and women gathered in the home of Tempie Washington to worship God. This group of Christians laid the spiritual cornerstone for African Methodism in Austin, Texas. With its religious fervor, these Christians felt a great concern for the education of the young people of the church. From this concern, in 1872 the birth and organization of Paul Quinn College came into being. It was only

two years after becoming organized as a church.

          1. Minister Frank Green

          2. Rev. Edward Hammett

          3. Rev. Jackson

          4. Rev. W.H. Ross

          5. Rev. Abraham Grant

ABOUT OUR HISTORY:

Visitors